The Most Amazing Real Estate Lawyer EVER. @agkeirstead

How many Realtors can tell you that they use a lawyer that closes a deal before noon, and makes sure that your commissions make it to the brokerage and get paid out on the same day of the possession? I CAN and his name is Andrew Keirstead. Andrew is a fantastic guy and I constantly receive rave reviews from my clients who are smart enough to take my advice and use him for closing theie Real Estate transactions. Andrew has been a huge asset to my Calgary Real Estate Business and I would highly recommend him for yours. Andrew also does Civil Litigation as well as Wills and Estates. Don’t let his diversification fool you…..he is EXELLENT at his job. Andrew can be reached at 403 271 3221 Firm name is Thornborough Smeltz see more here: http://www.thornsmeltz.com/bio_agk.html

If you are thinking of buying or selling this is only one of the reasons to work with us. We have aligned ourselves with the best service providers in the industry. I always say: “Over the years we have weeded out all of the boneheads” LOL! If you are making a move it is your Realtor’s job to make it as smooth and easy as possible.

Calgary / Okotoks Real Estate Heating Up!

So far this morning I have personally SOLD 3 homes. 2 listings Conditionally Sold and one buyer bought. In speaking with Dave Eger of CIR Realty’s South Calgary Office he did mention that he had been involved in a few multiple offer situations this week. In Okotoks Real Estate there were 9 homes reported as Conditionally SOLD at one point this last week.

The time is right for buyers to act. Between now and spring of 2012 is a great time for buyers to jump into the market inorder to buy at the lowest prices offered in the last 4 years or so, and also take advantage of the interest rates being offered at the lowest rates in any of our lifetimes.

If you know of somebody looking to upgrade the time is right. Sell a little low but buy back in the same market, and gain. If you are thinking of upgrading and wait for the market to get better, don’t forget that you will be paying more for your purchase and you will be losing overall.

If you are downsizing, and are not in a big rush to move, maybe you should be waiting for a slightly better market to benefit form selling higher. Even though you may pay slightly more, you may benefit overall from waiting to sell at higher prices. If you need to move keep in mind that a good agent will work hard to get you the most amount of money for the sale of your existing home, and then work hard to negotiate the lowest price possible for your new purchase. A good REALTOR is going to be well worth the fees they charge to sell your home. Key word: “good” lol.

First time buyers and people looking to upgrade their homes should get off the fence and get moving before hte market increases. Alberta is going to boom again. 

Correct me if I am wrong.

Tom.

Some Tips for Home Sellers

When you show your home to prospective buyers, there is probably a long list of things you’re hoping they’ll notice. For example, the beautiful chandelier in the foyer, or the spacious backyard and large deck, or the kitchen with the island big enough for a family to sit down for breakfast.

But what about those things you’re hoping buyers will not zero in on?

Every home has some features that are less than enticing to the typical buyer. You may not be able to do much about an unfinished basement or a home backing onto a noisy main street.

However, there are several things buyers don’t want to see that you can change. Here are five of the most common:

 • Clutter. Back rooms in basements filled with boxes and other items. Closets stuffed full of clothes. Rooms crammed with too much furniture. Clutter of any kind makes buyers feel uneasy and gets in the way of showcasing the wonderful features of your home.

• Maintenance issues. Buyers definitely don’t want to see a lot of things needing repairs or replacement, such as dripping faucets, faded or chipped walls, or overgrown lawns and shrubbery.

• Smells. You can’t see smells, of course. But buyers will notice the lingering aroma of exotic cooking, cigarette smoke, and pets.

• Personal items. Buyers will, of course, understand that a family is living in the home they’re viewing. However, constant reminders – in the form of vacation pictures, bowling trophies, or scattered children’s toys – can make a buyer feel like an intruder.

• You. It’s nothing personal, but buyers prefer to view your home without you in it.

The good news is all these things can easily be dealt with before you show your home.

Looking for more ideas on selling your home quickly and for the best price? Call today.

When Smaller is Sweeter – How to Take the Money and Run

Your house is quiet except for the hum of the refrigerator or the voices from the TV. The rooms are filled with pictures and memories, but the children have grown and gone. You spend hours each week cleaning rooms you never use. Are you an “empty nester” who needs a house for the future? Is it time to downsize or to move into another home more suitable for your retirement years? Here are some tell tale signs:

  • Your current home is too large for your lifestyle. Rather than close off the extra rooms or rent out the excess space, you may opt to move to a smaller home.
  • You are retired and your income is lower than it was during your prime working years. You may want or need to sell your current hoe and move to one with a smaller mortgage payment or less upkeep. Maybe you could live more comfortably in a lower cost-of-living area. If you have loaded up a home equity loan, selling the home could give you welcome cash to eliminate those payments.
  • As you approach your golden years, your wish is to have a home with hew, if any, stairs, or one which could easily converted to be handicap-accessible if the need arises.
  • You prefer a location where the weather is more to your year-round liking and where there are activities you like – golf, tennis, boating, or socializing with seniors – during your leisure time.
  • There is no capital gains tax on the sale of your principal residence. The profit on the sale of your home is tax free, which can provide you with an additional nest egg amount to use for your pleasure and leisure.

Getting it Sold

Once you have decided to sell and move, take a critical look at your current home. Even the best-maintained homes begin to show age.

Before you list your home for sale, be sure it’s in “move-in” condition. Make needed repairs and replacements so the house will show at its best.

Remember, homes that sell fastest and for top dollar show like a model home and are merchandised like a model, too. How does your home compare with other homes for sale, including new homes? Do you want to undergo major renovations, or would you prefer to make price concessions to help your home compete?

Here are some specific questions to ask yourself:

  • Are kitchen appliances up to date and in good working order? Does the kitchen have popular features like a microwave, or and island?
  • Up-to-date homes often have a master bedroom suite. Does yours? Does the master bathroom have a spa or soaking tub or dual-shower heads?
  • Do you have a home office? Is telephone wiring adequate to support an office phone, computer modem, fax machine?
  • Have you built any additions – a deck, patio, carport, sunroom – without first obtaining a building permit or without passing inspection?
  • Do carpets and tile need to be replaced? Will a professional cleaning make them look like new?
  • What do the walls look like? Do they suffer from puppy-bite or kitty-scratch? Should old, tired wallpaper be removed? Do walls and woodwork need repainting?
  • Can you make closets and counters look larger? Are there items you can pack away and do without until after you move?
  • Are shrubs and trees neat and does the yard look well kept and attractive?
  • How does your home compare to others currently for sale now? What can you do to make it say, “Buy me!”

Price is one answer. If you’ve owned your hoe for years, chances are good you’ve got some serious equity. Perhaps you can afford to be flexible on price in order to get it sold. After all, to get the best possible sale today, a house must be in tip-top condition in every way: price, condition, terms and exposure. That’s where we come in. Give us a call.

How You Know it’s Time to Move

Reason #10: When you first bought the house, you were out in the country, but now that same house is part of the city scene.

Reason #9: You can’t get anything repaired because “they stopped making those parts years ago.”

Reason #8: The swing set out in the backyard has grown roots.

Reason #7: The plumber’s phone number is on your speed dial.

Reason #6: You’re on a first-name basis with the handyman.

Reason #5: The children’s rooms have all been turned into guest bedrooms.

Reason #4: The newspaper lining the guest room dresser is dated July 4th, 1976.

Reason #3: You have to move the furniture to see the carpet’s original colour.

Reason #2: You can’t do anything to the exterior of your home without getting approval from the “Board of Historic Places”.

Reason #1: You haven’t visited half the house in the last six months.

Passing the Home Inspection – What Buyers Are Looking For

When you put your home up for sale you place it directly under the scrutiny of buyers. Superficial changes, such as new paint and resurfaced floors can do a lot to enhance your home’s appeal, but when it comes to an offer, most serious buyers will seek the assistance of a professional home inspector to ensure that the house is sound beneath the surface.

During most home inspections there are over forty problem areas that will be examined for correct function and condition. It is important that you are aware of what areas buyers will examine, and what you can do to ensure that these are in proper working order. In most cases you’ll be able to conduct a reasonable inspection yourself, if you know what to look for. This report will elaborate on some of the more important home inspection points, and will include information on:

  • Home Inspection areas and what to look for
  • How to make sure your home is as good beneath the surface as it is above

Home Inspection

Selling your home can be a difficult job, especially since you’re competing against hundreds of other properties. It’s important that you ensure that your home is in top condition, and doing a pre-inspection in anticipation of buyers doing the same is extremely important. Below are some areas that you should inspect:

Plumbing

Plumbing is of high priority when it comes to home inspections. Defective plumbing is classified in three ways namely leaking, clogging, and corrosion. A visual inspection will detect leaks and corrosion on pipes. Turning on all faucets in the highest bathroom and then flushing the toilet can gauge water pressure. The sound of water flowing through your pipes often indicates that the pipes are undersized. Additionally, if water coming from the pipes is dirty or contains debris, then the pipes are most likely rusting. The home inspector will evaluate all of these.

Damp or Wet Basement

The basement or crawl space is often the most revealing area in the building and usually provides a general picture of how the building works.

An inspector will check your walls for a powdery white mineral deposit a few inches off the floor, and will look to see if things you store right on your basement floor have suffered any moisture-related damage. Mildew odours are also a red flag for home inspectors. Difficult to eliminate, and indicative of other problems, an inspector will certainly be conscious of them.

Depending on severity and location it could cost you between $400 and $1,100 to seal a crack in your basement foundation. Another option is to add a sump pump and pit, which could cost around $750-$1,000. Finally complete waterproofing of an average 3-bedroom home could cost between $5,000 and $15,000. It’s important to factor these costs into the calculation of what you want to net on the sale of you home.

Damp Attic Spaces

Just as detrimental to a home seller as basement dampness are mould and mildew problems in the attic. Improper ventilation, insulation and vapour barriers can cause water and moisture to accumulate in the attic. This moisture and associated mould and mildew can lead to premature wear of the roof, structure and building materials. Oftentimes costs associated with fixing this damage can be in excess of $2,500.

Roofing Problems

The major problem associated with roofing problems is leakage, which can occur for a variety of reasons. Physical deterioration of asphalt shingles, mechanical damage from a windstorm or ice build-up as a result of poor drainage are all common causes of roofing issues. Leaky gutters and downspouts can also damage siding and exterior walls. Remember that it is only a matter of time before external damage becomes an internal problem.

Rotting Wood

Rotting wood, an issue particularly prevalent in older homes, can occur in many places such as door or window frames, trim, siding, decks and fences. Building inspectors will oftentimes probe the wood to check its integrity – and are particularly sceptical of woodwork that has been freshly painted.

Masonry Work

Brickwork commonly succumbs to water damage, minor ground and foundation settling and a host of other time-related changes. Redoing brickwork can be expensive, but when left unattended can sag, warp or even collapse. It’s particularly important to inspect your chimney for signs of moisture damage and structural integrity as problems in this area can lead to falling bricks and collapsing roof stacks.

Inadequate Wiring and Electrical Systems

Inadequate wiring can occur in many forms. Home inspectors will look at octopus plugs and extension cables as indications of inadequate circuits and potential fire hazards. Also your home should have a minimum of 100 amps service, and this should be clearly marked. All wiring should be copper or aluminium.

Unsafe or Over Fused Electrical Circuits

Unsafe electrical conditions are created when more amperage is drawn from a circuit than is intended. 15 Amp circuits are the most common in typical homes, although larger circuits are used for appliances such as stoves and dryers.

Older homes will also contain fuse panels rather than circuit breakers. Replacing a fuse panel with a circuit panel can often cost hundreds of dollars, but will be a factor that the home inspector will examine.

Poor Heating and Cooling Systems

A home inspector will scrutinize heating and cooling systems for efficiency and performance.

Insufficient insulation, and an inadequate or poorly functioning heating system, are the most common causes of poor heating. A home inspector will check the age of your furnace to see if it exceeds the typical life span of 15-25 years. Additionally, in a forced air gas system, the inspector will place the heat exchanger under particular scrutiny examining for cracks and damage as a potential source of carbon monoxide in your home. If the heat exchanger is damaged it must be replaced as it cannot be repaired.

Cooling systems are of equal importance. A home inspector will examine your air conditioning unit to evaluate size, installation, noisiness, dehumidification and cooling ability. A home inspector will pay particular attention to the exterior compressor/condenser units to make sure they are free of debris and have sufficient room in which to operate.

Adequate Security Features

A home inspector will examine your home for proper locks on windows and patio doors, dead bolts on the doors, smoke and even carbon monoxide detectors in every bedroom and on every level. Installing these components can add to your costs, but will demonstrate an adherence to basic security standards in your home. A purchased security system will also be examined.

Structural/Foundation Problems

An inspector will most definitely examine the underlying footing and foundation of your home. A cracked foundation or unstable footing can cost thousands in your home’s value.

Why It Is So Important That Your Home Is Correctly Priced and Marketed Properly

“… Your home is your castle–even when it’s for sale…”
Let’s say your terms are competitive: your timing’s clearly set. Now, what about your asking price? Without question, price is your most important sales tool. Here’s why:

The period of best opportunity for selling a home at a reasonable price is the first four weeks after it is put on the market. Buyers who have seen most available listings are waiting for just the right house to come on the market. If your house is priced right from the beginning, you are in the best position to attract the maximum number of buyers able to pay the price your home is worth – and to sell your home within your timetable.

  • If your house is under priced, you may be swamped with lookers and perhaps get many offers. But you could lose thousands on one of your family’s largest investments.
  • If your house is overpriced, lookers are apt to be few and far between, with little chance of any offers to pay your unrealistic price. You may lower your price later, but by that time you will have missed many of the most interested buyers.

How do you Set the Right Price?

Arriving at an asking price involves up-to-the-minute research and experienced judgment. Besides enlisting my help in checking out the current Real Estate market conditions and financing trends, the basic steps include:

  • Measuring your home against similar neighborhood homes that have recently been sold or are currently on the market.
  • Determine what features make your house stand out among others currently on the market. After all, buyers are comparison shoppers. Weighing the spending of a reasonable amount of money on cosmetic fix-ups that might enhance the marketability of your house and earn the highest possible sale price.

The right price is usually within 5% of market value (a constantly changing factor) and usually results in a fair-dollar sale within a reasonable amount of time. As we say, “price sells.”

Why is overpricing risky?

A price more than 5% over market value may have these results:

  • Buyers may resist inspecting your home because they can find better values elsewhere. (Overpriced houses tend to sell the competition first.)
  • Potential buyers who can’t afford the price don’t bother to look–or to make offers.
  • A buyer willing to pay an over market price may have difficulty getting financing. Lenders may not approve a loan if the appraisal is lower than the contract price. (The delay from a failed sale can mean missing out on the critical first 30-day marketing period.)
  • Your unsold home will begin to get “stale,” as the marketplace assumes there is “something wrong” with the house.
  • To make up for lost time you might be inclined to lower the price below competing houses in order to move it.

Is it Ever Smart to Under Price?

Setting a price below market value usually isn’t preferable because you may be losing money. If time is more important than money and you need a faster-than-average sale, you may consider setting a bargain price to attract the greatest number of prospects. Market value delivers the optimum number of prospects at the best price for a quick sale.

When you’re ready to sell your home, take advantage of my Real Estate expertise to help you price your home to sell.

How a Market Analysis Helps Price it Right

Only a professional market analysis can give you the accurate, reliable foundation you need to price your home right. When you ask me to make a fair-market analysis of your home, here is what I do:

  • Evaluate your home’s location and lot size; your home’s age, size and condition; the number of bedrooms, baths, total rooms; the kinds of extra feature you have (such as improvements, built-ins, garage, tool shed, spa).
  • Examine the condition and appearance of your homes exterior and interior. I can help you determine what repairs or refurbishing may be needed to sell your home at its best price.
  • Review the assessed value of your home, its previous sale prices, your maintenance and utility costs and your local taxes.
  • Compare your home with similar area properties currently for sale or recently sold.
  • Note current Real Estate market conditions with a practiced eye; also current interests rates and lenders’ criteria.

How to Sell Your Home Yourself

If you ask anyone who has ever tried to sell their home themselves, they’ll tell you that from the moment the “For Sale by Owner” sign goes up, the phone begins to ring. Unfortunately, many of those calls will not be from prospective buyers but rather from Real Estate agents looking to obtain your listing.

Obviously the idea of not having to pay a commission to a Real Estate agent is attractive to any home seller. But because of all the issues involved in the process, selling a home on one’s own can be as challenging as many home sellers will attest to. The key is to be properly prepared. If you are not, your home could remain on the market longer than you expect because you are not attracting and getting offers from qualified buyers. This can be the point where many homeowners become frustrated and consider giving up their dream of selling their home themselves.

However, there are sellers who successfully accomplish selling their own homes. You can be one of them. This industry report has been especially prepared to assist home sellers, such as yourself, understand the elements involved so you, on your own, can sell your home quickly for the most amount of profit.

To help you prepare, here are 10 inside tips that you should be aware of before you make the decision as to whether or not this is the right approach for you.

Price it Right

Correctly setting your asking price is critical. Setting your price too high can be as costly as setting it too low. Home prices are determined by fluctuations in the marketplace, not by your emotional attachment or by what you feel your home is worth. In order to establish a realistic price for your home, objectively compare the price, features and condition of all similar homes in both your neighbourhood and other similar ones that have sold in recent months. It is also important for you to be familiar with the terms of each potential sale. Terms are often as important as price in today’s market. Carefully budget your selling costs and prepare a net proceeds sheet to calculate your best estimate of what you will take away from your home sale. Prospective buyers may also request this kind of analysis of buying costs.

Prepare your Home for Sale

First impression is crucial. Make sure your home makes a positive statement by carefully inspecting all details and viewing it through the objective eyes of a buyer. Don’t gloss over needed repairs and fix-ups, as your prospective buyers won’t. Your job is to ensure that your home stands out favourably from the competition.

Prepare Yourself with all Necessary Legal Documentation

Not surprisingly, there are many important legal contracts and documents that you must assemble, complete and understand. A partial checklist of forms that you will require for prospective buyers and for legal documentation is as follows:

  • Seller’s Disclosure
  • Buyer’s Advisory
  • Purchase Contract
  • Preliminary Title Report
  • Termite Inspection
  • Mortgage Payoff
  • HOA Disclosures & Restrictions
  • Loan Application Forms
  • Lead Based Paint Disclosures
  • Property Profile Fact Sheet
  • Buyer’s Cost Sheet
  • Home Warranty Order Forms
  • Personal Property Exclusion List
  • Property Survey (if applicable)
  • Home Inspection Order Forms
  • Market Your Home Effectively

Beyond the sign you will put on your lawn, you should find effective ways to spread the word about your home. Local buyers can be reached through the newspaper, but this is only a small part of the market you are after. Be sure you include the many buyers who could already be working with a Realtor®. To locate them, target as many top agents as possible in your market to see if the criteria of their buyers match those of your home.

Because out-of town buyers are also important targets, you should create a strategy to reach these people as well. Above all, you should be very service-minded and make it easy for pre-qualified buyers to view your home. Ensure there is always someone available to answer the phone, check messages frequently, and be ready to give qualified prospects a tour of your home as soon as possible.

Remain Objective During a Showing of Your Home

Keep emotion out of the sale of your home, and the best way to do this during a showing is to remain physically in the background. If a prospective buyer says something negative about your home, it is better to counter-balance this point of view by illustrating the positives rather than becoming defensive.

Pre-Qualify Your Prospects

Don’t waste your time entertaining buyers who could never afford your home. Research their financial steadiness with respect to job security, salary, debts, liabilities and credit standing.

Negotiate Effectively & Knowledgeably

There will be many details to resolve before a sale can be considered final: price, terms, inspections, possession date, buyer concerns and objections. Make sure you fully understand the contract you have drawn up so you can in turn explain details and ramifications to the buyer and make any amendments to the sale that are necessary. The contract you use should be thoroughly examined by your Real Estate attorney. Some Real Estate brokers may be willing to help you do this. While this is going on, manage the buyer’s interest in your home so that it doesn’t wane during negotiations.

Know Your Buyer

Your objectives during negotiations are to control the pace and set the duration. Try to determine what your buyer’s motivation is. Does he or she need to move quickly? Do they have enough money to pay your asking price? Knowing this information will give you the advantage in the negotiation because you will know up front what you will need to do in order to get what you want.

Don’t Move Out Before You Sell

Studies have shown that it is more difficult to sell a home that is vacant. It looks forlorn, forgotten, simply not appealing. It could even cost you money. If you move, you’re also telling buyers that you have a new home and are motivated to sell fast which can, of course, gives them an advantage at the negotiating table.

Know Why You’re Selling and Keep it to Yourself

The flip side of “understanding your buyer” is to “understand yourself”. Your reasons for selling will affect everything from your list price to how much time and money you will invest in getting your home ready for sale. Your motivation will help you determine what is more important to you: the money you walk away with, the length of time your property is on the market, or both. Different goals will dictate different strategies. As someone who wants to sell without a Real Estate agent in an effort to save the commission, it is likely that money is one of your primary considerations (see inset box below). Whatever your reasons, however, it is very important to keep them to yourself so as not to place yourself at a disadvantage at the negotiation table. When asked, simply say your housing needs have changed.

How to Assess Your Net Gain

To analyze whether or not you will end up ahead by choosing to sell on your own, consider the fact that most buyers do use a Real Estate agent because it doesn’t cost them anything for this service (i.e. the seller pays the agent’s fee). Be cautious as buyers, investors and speculators who seek out For Sale by
Owners are typically those in search of a bargain. The low-ball offers from these types of buyers will often net you much lower in the long run. What you will have to judge for yourself is the following:

  1. Be as prepared as possible with your marketing, negotiations, evaluations, showings and all legalities.
  2. Consider what it will cost you to effectively market your home and assemble all necessary materials from the “for sale” sign to any contracts?
  3. What price will a buyer offer you as a For Sale by Owner minus the costs identified in point 2 above. Is this net price higher than the price an experienced agent could net for you minus his/her commission?

Your House Didn’t Sell – Now What?

“… The first thing to do is take a step back and analyze the situation…”
You put your home up for sale and it simply didn’t sell. Undoubtedly, this has created a lot of stress, inconvenience and anxiety for you and your family. Perhaps you already bought another home. Maybe you needed this home sold because of a job change. Regardless of the reason, it’s certainly a burden! What Should You Do?

The first thing to do is to take a step back and analyze the situation. Try to assess what factors led to your home not selling. Below are the top four reasons why homes tend to languish on the market:

Is The Property Overpriced?

Overpricing your property is usually the number one reason it did not sell. Assuming your neighborhood or area has homes with similar features (number of bedrooms and baths, lot size, etc.) on the market for a lower price, buyers will naturally buy those properties first. The price of your property should be competitively priced with these other homes. That means if you want to sell your home, price the home at or slightly below the comparables. Your Real Estate agent will help you establish the best price based on the competition. Again, pricing your property above comparable properties can easily cause it to languish.

Another problem with pricing higher than competitive properties is the price reductions. Most homeowners will reduce the price once they realize their home is priced higher than the competition. When your Real Estate agent enters the price reduction in the MLS, the property is probably at or near where it should have been priced in the first place. The problem now is you missed a lot of the buyers the first round that bought comparable homes for the same price you have just reduced your home to.

To overcome this situation, you are going to have to make sure your new, reduced price is extremely competitive. If your price reduction still leaves the asking price of your home higher than any comparables, your home will probably continue to languish. Your Real Estate agent will help you assess the competition and help you establish an asking price that will get the home sold.

Condition Of The Property

All of the cosmetic things, such as paint, landscaping, window coverings and flooring should be in good shape. The house should be spotlessly clean inside and out! It’s amazing how most buyers refuse to see “through” superficial, cosmetic shortcomings. To illustrate this point, most buyers can walk into a “perfect” home that is priced below market. However, if the house is cluttered, the carpet is worn, or the house has a strong pet odor, they move on to look at the next house. And making these cosmetic improvements costs little… mostly your time! To get the house sold, make a small investment in:

  • Landscaping: Make sure lawn is in good shape and trees and shrubs neat and trimmed. Make sure gutters are clear. If you don’t have the time to do it, pay someone.
  • Exterior of home: Make sure there is no chipping paint, dirty windows, or clutter in the yard. Most importantly, remember that most buyers will notice the condition of the front door when they walk in.
  • Interior: Make sure the carpets are clean and attractive, the walls painted (if it needs it) and clean (no smudges!), the kitchen clutter-free and the windows are spotless. Also, remove excess furniture (rule of thumb is put half the furniture in storage or the basement). Excess furniture makes rooms appear much smaller. Make sure all clothes are off the floor and organized in closets. And finally, make sure the smell of the home is appealing. Vanilla scent works very well with most buyers.

Was Your Property Aggressively Marketed?

Another primary reason for homes languishing on the market is a simple lack of exposure. In a very hot market, a listing in the Multiple Listing Service alone should generate an adequate number of buyers. However, if your market is anything less than red-hot, the amount of inventory will increase and your home needs aggressive marketing.

Most buyers work with Real Estate agents. A good Real Estate agent will make sure your property is exposed to the active Real Estate agents in your areas by presenting your property to many of the area offices. Also, most active Real Estate agents have a strong network of other agents, and they’re usually on the phone pushing the property to the other agent’s buyers.

Make sure your property is advertised in home magazines. Many buyers pull these off the racks of grocery, convenience and drug stores when they are actively looking to buy a home. Most importantly, make sure your property is advertised in heavily trafficked web sites like MLS.ca. Well over 80% of buyers use the Internet to look for homes!

Finally, and Most Importantly, Did You Hire The “Right” Real Estate Agent?

Like any profession, there are very effective and ineffective agents. Many agents work hard and employ strong marketing techniques. Many agents have a strong network and access to buyers. Many agents work hard to get your home sold. However, many do not. Did your agent simply place the house in the Multiple Listing Service? Or, did she or he inform their network of buyers about your property? How about presenting your property at sales meetings both at her or his office and other company offices? Did she or he promote your property at the local Real Estate board meeting, where many agents gather to share inventory? Did she or he use aggressive advertising, including Real Estate magazines and heavily trafficked Internet web sites?

Ask yourself, was your agent passionate about selling your property? If not, now is the time to find the agent who will get your home sold.